Program Committee Track Co-Chair for Plant Cryobiotechnology at CRYO2019

Gayle VolkGayle Volk, a CRYO2019 Program Committee Track Co-Chair for Plant Cryobiotechnology, has recently been in the news about a study into heritage apple cultivars in Wyoming, USA. Samples from Heritage apples, planted in the 1800s, were collected from nearly a hundred farms, orchards, or homesteads and are being studied to determine existing traits that allow these trees to survive, even thrive, in the harsh, cold Wyoming climate. 

The original article can be found HERE

Potential Male Cancer Fertility Breakthrough

Photo by Magda Ehlers from PexelsTesticle tissue samples from the rhesus macaques are being used in new research to preserve the fertility of preadolescent boys with cancer. Kyle Orwig from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and his team, removed testicle tissue from 5 prepubescent monkeys. After the monkeys reached sexual maturity, the tissue was grafted back onto the monkey's back and scrotum and within 12 months all 5 monkeys were producing testosterone and sperm. The team used the sperm from one of the monkeys to successfully impregnate a female.

Prior to puberty, young boys don't develop sperm that can be preserved in the event of infertility, a common side effect of chemotherapy and radiation. By taking small testicle samples of these young boys, researchers hope to be able to preserve the fertility of these future cancer survivors. The original article can be found HERE

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Call for Fellow Nominations

Fellow Nominations Open 

CALL FOR CRYOFELLOW NOMINATIONS - DEADLINE APRIL 30

Gao
President, Jason Acker, presents President-Elect, Dayong Gao with the CryoFellow Medal at CRYO2017. 

The 2018 CryoFellows Nominations Committee is now soliciting nominations for the appointment of new CryoFellows. This Committee, consisting of three members of the Board of Governors and two CryoFellows, evaluates the nominations and makes recommendations to the Board for approval of new Fellows.

Jan 30: Nominations Open 
April 30: Nominations Close
May - mid-July: Evaluation of nomination materials by Fellow Committee
July 21: Board of Governors to vote on Fellow Committee recommendations
July 22: Announcement of New Fellows at CRYO2019 in San Diego

The Society for Cryobiology established an award and medal of CryoFellow just over a decade ago in recognition of members of the society and individuals from the cryobiology community at large who have had an outstanding impact on the field.

CryoFellows are awarded this prestigious status in recognition of: scientific impact of their research on cryobiology (50%); sustained nature of that impact (20%); generation of scientific offspring (20%); and service to the Society (10%).

There is no formal application form on which to make the nomination, but the documents you provide the committee should be of sufficient depth to support the candidate's contributions to the categories mentioned above in a clear and demonstrable way. Usually this will mean inclusion with the nomination:

(1) Supporting letters from members of the Society or other major contributors to cryobiology (including one from the nominator); and 

(2) a detailed resume for the nominee. I suggest you contact the proposed CryoFellow to discuss their nomination before proceeding and to obtain the resume from the nominee.

Please note the nominated individual must be living at the time that he or she is nominated.

If there is someone you would like to nominate, or you would like to have an informal discussion before proceeding with nomination, please email me at [email protected]

New UCL and Royal Free Ovarian Tissue Bank

New UCL and Royal Free Ovarian Tissue Bank

University College London (UCL) and the Royal Free London Hospital have announced a new ovarian tissue bank to preserve the fertility of girls and women about to undergo treatment for cancer. 

The publically funded initiative will be led by UCL academic Dr. Paul Hardiman (UCL Institute of Women's Health) and consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology at the Royal Free Hospital in London, with consultation by Society for Cryobiology Fellow, Prof. Barry Fuller, head of research for the UCL Division of Surgery, and  Prof. Mark Lowdell, UCL director of Cellular Therapeutics.

Worldwide there have been approximately 100 live births following ovarian tissue preservation and subsequent reimplantation on the remaining ovary or into the lining of the abdominal cavity. 

Dr. Hardiman, tissue bank director, said: 
“We have modelled our protocols on how it is done at the Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, one of the largest hospitals in Denmark, where they have been freezing human ovarian tissue since 1999. This is a well-established method in Europe, the US and Japan but the UK has lagged behind and patients often faced having to go abroad and pay to receive this treatment. At a time when patients need to concentrate on life-saving therapies this intervention needs to take place as quickly as possible.”

“What makes the Royal Free London so ideally suited to provide this service is that we have a unique mix of facilities and expertise in tissue freezing and cell therapy including Professor Barry Fuller, head of research for the UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional Science and Professor Mark Lowdell, director of Cellular Therapeutics.  We are also a leading kidney and liver transplant centre and the principle UK centre for cell and tissue medicines which has helped facilitate approval from the Human Tissue Authority. We are very grateful for the support from the Royal Free Charity over the past seven years which funded Natalie Getreu*, a PhD student, who played an important role in enabling us to bring this to patients.”

*Society for Cryobiology student member, Natalie Getreu, presented her PhD research for the Ovarian Tissue Bank at CRYO2017 and CRYO2016. 









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John Armitage Awarded OBE

W. John Armitage named Officer of the British Empire (OBE) 

John-ArmitageProf. W. John Armitage has recently been awarded an OBE for services to corneal transplantation in the Queen's New Year Honours list. 

John is the Head of Research and Development for Ocular Tissue, NHS Blood and Transplant, Emeritus Professor, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, and former Director of Bristol Tissue Bank, which comprised the Bristol Eye Bank and Bristol Heart Valve Bank. 

John completed his PhD in cardiac cryopreservation and research posts in Cambridge, UK and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA, before joining the Department of Opthamology in Bristol, UK, where he set up the Bristol Eye Bank to carry out research into corneal preservation.

The Bristol Eye Bank, one of the largest eye banks in Europe, is home to the UK's Corneal Transplant Service (CTS), which provides corneas to hospitals across the UK. Since 1986 the CTS has provided corneal transplants for over 70,000 patients through the UK's National Health Service (NHS). Although funded by the NHS, management of the eye bank remained at Bristol until 2015, at which time it was transferred to the National Health Service Blood and Transplant (NHSBT), the public body overseeing all blood, organ, and tissue transplants in the UK. 

One of the major breakthroughs of the CTS was the introduction of 34°C (93°F) organ culture storage, which extended the life of transplants from a few days, to approximately four weeks. This transformed the face of corneal transplantation in the UK by improving logistics and supply, allowing transplants to be scheduled weeks in advance, as opposed to emergency surgery.  

Speaking of his award, John said,  "I am delighted to have my work recognised in this way, which also reflects the significant impact of the work of the Bristol Eye Bank and acknowledges the collective effort of NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) and Bristol University staff, ophthalmology colleagues in Bristol Eye Hospital and hospitals throughout the UK, and the support of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. However, above all, it is the thoughtfulness and generosity of the families of eye donors, without whom corneal transplantation would not be possible, that truly merit the thanks of patients and their doctors."

John is the current President of the European Eye Bank Association, of which he was a founding member, Associate Editor of Cryobiology, and a long time member and former Governor of the Society for Cryobiology. 

CRYO2020 Location Announced

CRYO2020 Location Announced 

The Board of Governors is pleased to announce that the location for CRYO2020 is America's Windy City, Chicago. 

Location
Crowne Plaza Chicago O'Hare Hotel and Conference Center 
440 N River Rd, Rosemont, IL 60018, USA

Dates
Board of Governors Meeting/Evening Welcome Reception: Monday July 20, 2020
Annual Meeting: Tuesday July 21 - Friday July 24, 2020

Further details will follow in the second half of 2019. 

New Fellows Announced

New Fellows Announced

The Board of Governors is pleased to announce the recent approval of two new Fellows of the Society for Cryobiology: Jason Acker and Janet Elliott. Janet and Jason will be presented with their Fellow medals during a special session at CRYO2019, held in San Diego, July 22-25, 2019. 

Jason Acker 
Jason AckerDr. Jason Acker is a Senior Research Scientist with the Canadian Blood Services and a Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. He received his Bachelor of Science, Master of Science in Experimental Pathology and PhD in Medical Sciences degrees from the University of Alberta.  In 2000, Dr. Acker completed a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Acker received a Master of Business Administration in Technology Commercialization program from the Alberta School of Business at the University of Alberta in 2009. 

Focusing his research on understanding the biological response of cells to freezing and freeze-drying has allowed Dr. Acker to develop a solid foundation from which he has contributed to the design of new methods for the long-term storage of a number of cell types and tissues. 

Dr. Acker’s research program over the past 15 years has continued to focus on expanding our understanding of the biological response of cells and tissues to freezing and freeze-drying.  His work has specifically focused on the development of intracellular protectants as a novel class of molecules that can protect cells and tissues during freezing and drying. In addition to the seminal contributions to our understanding of cryoinjury that Dr. Acker has made, it has been the translation work that he is often most recognized for. In the area of transfusion medicine, Dr. Acker is a world leader in understanding the effects of blood component manufacturing and low-temperature storage on patient outcomes and has led many national and international efforts to improve the quality and safety of blood components. Dr. Acker’s blood services laboratory has responsibility for developing scientific and technical evidence to support innovative changes in blood product manufacturing, storage and utilization at CBS.  Dr. Acker leads efforts to assess new technology, products and processes that can improve the efficiency, quality and safety of blood product manufacturing.  Through his study of low temperatures, Dr. Acker has made, and will continue to make, significant contributions the practical aspects of cell and tissue banking.

Janet Elliott
Janet Elliott
Biography courtesy of University of Alberta
Dr. Elliott obtained her B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science (Engineering Physics Option) and her M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Toronto. She has been a Visiting Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at the Oxford Centre for Collaborative Applied Mathematics.

Dr. Elliott currently serves as Associate Editor of the journal Cryobiology, on the Editorial Advisory Board of The Journal of Physical Chemistry, and on the American Chemical Society Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry Executive Committee. She has served on scientific committees for international conferences in the areas of cryobiology, surfaces and colloids, and space physical sciences. She has served on grant selection committees for all three of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). She has served as a member of the Physical Sciences Advisory Committee for the Canadian Space Agency and on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

Dr. Elliott’s research has been recognized nationally in science and engineering by the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering Syncrude Canada Innovation Award (2008), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Doctoral Prize (1998), the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers Young Engineer Achievement Award (2001), the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Young Explorer’s Prize (2002) and Time Magazine’s Canadians Who Define the New Frontiers of Science (2002). Dr. Elliott has also received provincial and University awards including the University of Alberta Teaching Unit Award (2004, 2016). As one student put it, “She could convince rocks to study thermodynamics.” 














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New Website Launch

New Website Launch 

The Society for Cryobiology is pleased to announce the launch of their brand new website. 

New Features

  • Completely Updated Template - Mobile responsive template with a fresh, modern feel.
  • Integrated Payment Gateway - Say goodbye to Paypal. You'll now stay on the Society's site while you check out using your credit or debit card. 
  • Automated Dues Invoicing - Dues renewal notices will be triggered automatically with each member receiving a customized invoice to pay online. Simply click the button in your email, and pay online with your credit card. 
  • Updated Membership Form - Apply or renew using the same form, with advanced field logic permissioning fields to appropriate applicants/users only. 
  • New Job Board - The Society has partnered with JobBoard.io who offer special pricing to Associations. Post your job on the Society's Job Board only, or push it out to the entire Zip Recruiter network. The choices is yours. 
  • Brand New Member Directory - Logged in members can search for members, or view the entire directory (members must opt in to the directory to be viewable).
  • Updated and Revised Members' Area - Stay tuned as we add more members' only content over the coming year. 
  • New 'Industry' Menu Item - A call to action for industry professionals to get involved with the Society by supporting our Annual Meeting
  • New 'Resources' Menu Item - New pages include 'Position Statements', 'Scientific Partners', and a soon to be added Press Release page. 
  • Sponsor Widget - We can now recognize the sponsors of our Annual Meeting using a sponsor advertisement which will appear in the sidebar, or at the bottom of your screen. 
  • Donation Widget - A high visibility call to action asking site visitors to donate to the Society. 
  • Upgraded Events Calendar - Now dynamically displays event name, date and location in an automatically generated events calendar. 

Membership Dues Increase

Membership Dues Increase

At the Board of Governor's end of year quarterly meeting they voted to increase individual membership dues from $75, to $90 for the 2019 membership year. This is the first increase in membership dues since 2015. The price of the journal subscription remains unchanged at $185 for 6 issues over 12 months. 

The additional funds will go towards supporting the recently created Young Investigator Award, which will be available to enter by young professionals <10 years post-PhD. The award will carry an honorarium of $5,000, and the opportunity for the winner to present their research in a plenary session or symposium at the Society's Annual Meeting. 

The next anticipated review of membership dues will be in 2022. 

CRYO2019 Call for Abstracts

CRYO2019 Call for Abstracts 

The first call for abstracts for CRYO2019 has been released on November 26, 2018. Abstract submission will close on March 4, 2019. 

For more information and to submit your abstract please visit the CRYO2019 website

Election Winners

2018 Election Winners 

Congratulations to the Society for Cryobiology 2018 election winners for Governor:

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2018 Election

2018 Election

2018 Election Candidates
Top: John G. Baust, Rob Ben, Ali Eroglu
Botton: Xiaoming "Shawn" He, Peter Kilbride, Estefania Paredes, Gang Zhao

This year's Society for Cryobiology election will be held October 15-29, 2018.  The election is for three Governor-at-Large positions for a three year term, commencing January 2019 and ending December 2021.

DOWNLOAD CANDIDATE BIOGRAPHIES






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SLTB 2018 Meeting Report

SLTB 2018 Meeting Report 

Guest Post by Alasdair Kay, University of York, United Kingdom 

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New Website Consultation

New Website Consultation

Keep Calm

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Pierre Boutron Named CryoFellow

Pierre Boutron Named CryoFellow

Pierre Boutron has recently been announced as the 2018 Society for Cryobiology Basil J. Luyet CryoFellow.
Pierre Boutron CryoFellow
Pictured Above: Society for Cryobiology President, Dayong Gao, presents Pierre Boutron with the Basil J. Luyet Fellow Medal during the opening ceremony of CRYO2018, held July 10, 2018. 

Dr. Boutron is recognized today as the man who taught us how to understand the amorphous, or non-crystalline, state of solutions of cryoprotective agents, however as early as 1978 he was also the first person to envision achieving vitrification at low cooling rates using high concentrations of cryoprotectants. That was one reason he sought to understand the conditions required to prevent significant quantities of ice from forming during either cooling or warming. It was also the reason he set out to discover novel cryoprotectants that would favor vitrification. 

In his 1978 manuscript 'Stability of the Amorphous State in the System Water-Glycerol-Dimethylsulfoxide' published in Cryobiology lengthy tables show in great detail the amount of ice formed in different solutions at different warming rates and temperatures based on differential scanning calorimetry, or DSC, which Dr. Boutron introduced into the field of cryobiology. He also displayed rigorous proof of the absence of ice by X-ray crystallography, or elucidation of the apparent form of ice when ice did form. This paper also introduced the fundamental concept of the existence of critical cooling and warming rates, without which vitrification can hardly even be correctly discussed today. 





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Assemble Plus Marine Funding Call

Assemble Plus Marine Funding Call

Assemble Plus

Assemble Plus has opened its second call for access to infrastructure in Marine labs in Europe. 

Assemble Plus funds acess, travel and living expenses for researchers to carry out experiments using marine organisms or equipment available in the marine stations within its member network.

View the Funding Call, check out the FAQ, and visit the Assemble Plus website to find out more information. 

Research Associate in Cryopreservation

Research Associate in Cryopreservation

University: Newcastle University, United Kingdom NewCastle University
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Closing Date: 14th September 2018 

For informal enquiries please contact Dr. Roman Bauer
View the Job Description and Postdoc Advertisement
Apply online now

An exciting job opportunity as a Postdoctoral Research Associate is available at Newcastle University, between the Institute of Genetic Medicine (IGM) and the School of Computing (CS). The RA will conduct experimental work in a multidisciplinary team, comprising Dr Roman Bauer (CS), Prof. Majlinda Lako (IGM) and Prof. Evelyne Sernagor (Institute of Neuroscience).

You will work on a project studying the impact of cryopreservation on different kinds of biological tissues. Cryogenic processing protocols will be tested and assessed using a wide range of experimental methods, taking into account anatomy, gene expression and electrical activity. The goal of the project led by Dr Roman Bauer, in collaboration with GE Healthcare and CERN, is to model and improve tissue cryopreservation to yield high-quality post-thaw tissue.

You will hold a PhD in a bioscience discipline and have experience in several experimental techniques, which can be for instance immunohistochemistry, primary cell/tissue culture, qPCR and/or pluripotent stem cell differentiation. Ideally, you will also have experience in at least one electrophysiology method, e.g. in patch clamp or multi-electrode array (MEA) recording.

You will be highly ambitious, have excellent written and spoken English language skills, the ability to present clearly your work, supervise students and collaborate efficiently in a multidisciplinary team. You will have the opportunity to learn new experimental techniques (e.g. organoid growth or MEA recordings from retina), develop leadership skills or quantitative or computational skills if you wish.

The post is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and tenable for 32 months on a full-time basis. As part of your application, please provide a CV and covering letter which details your prior experience in experimental work.

CRYO2018 Report

CRYO2018 Report 

CRYO2018, which took place July 10-13 at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) in Madrid, Spain, was one of the Society's largest meetings in recent memory, attracting 300 abstract submissions and 250 delegates from 35 countries worldwide.

For full details of the program download the electronic copy of the program book and abstract supplement. You can also view all the photos from CRYO2018

Program
The meeting featured 175 oral presentations and over 100 poster presentations, across 5 plenary sessions, 10 symposia, 17 sessions and 2 poster sessions. Alongside traditional sessions exploring cell and tissue preservation, ice formation, tools and technologies, and plant cryopreservation, there were several sessions which stood out as sessions of note. These included three sessions organized jointly with the Organ Preservation Alliance on the current situation and future research required for organ preservation, and cryopreservation of reproductive tissue for cancer survivors. Additionally, due to the expertise of the local organizing committee, the meeting also included sessions on Cryobiology in Food Science and Technology and Challenges in Cryobiology for Microorganisms. 

Central Collage




















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Election2018

Election 2018

Nominations are now open for the 2018 election for 3 governors 2019-2021


The nominations committee is now inviting nominations from all Society members in good standing for the position of Governor 2019-2021. There are 3 posts available. 

Please register your interest in standing for election with Nicole Evans by June 1, 2018. A detailed biography and candidate statement outlining your vision for the Society will be requested thereafter. 

The 2018 nominating committee is: 
Adam Higgins (Chair; President-Elect)
Dayong Gao (President)
Greg Fahy (Governor)
Erik Woods (Governor)
Ido Braslavsky (Governor)

Please note all nominations are subject to approval by the nominations committee. This does not affect your right to nomination by petition as outlined in the society's bylaws

Volunteers Required

Volunteers Required! 

 Volunteer

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